Teas for Colds and Flu Remedies

copper tea kette

Basic Tea-making Instructions:

Place all the herbs in a tea ball or tea bag. (This tea bag can be as simple as a patch of muslin gathered up and tied above the bundle of dried leaves, roots or flowers).

Tea for One;
If you are only making enough for one serving you can place it in your favourite drinking cup or mug. Pour boiling water from a kettle over the herbs. Steep for 10 minutes, remove the herbs and enjoy.

Tea for Two or Three;
If you want to make enough tea to share with a few others, you can place the tea ball or tea bag in a teapot. Pour the boiling water over it. (Sometimes I put a teaspoon of honey into the pot at this point). Wait to steep the tea about ten minutes, remove the herbs and then pour, and enjoy with friends.

Tea for More;
If you will be sharing your tea with a few more people, I suggest you stuff the tea ball with a bit more herbs, or make a larger tea bag. Place this in a glass or ceramic pitcher, perhaps 1 litre or 1 quart size. Again, pour over the hot, boiling water, and add the honey if you think people will prefer some sweetener - or, allow them to add it to their individual cups when you have poured it.

Iced Tea;
The same instructions as above, except that I use a larger pitcher, and once the tea has steeped, I add a tray or two of ice cubes. If the tea still seems a bit warm, or it will be a while before I serve it, I set it in the fridge to cool still more. My favourite is to do this with mint from my garden. Guests always say this iced mint tea is very refreshing on a hot day.

Dressings for Tea;
Naturally, individuals have their favourite additions with which they like to dress up their teas. So if they insist, I let them add sugar, any other artificial sweetener, or milk or cream to their taste. I try not to let my own tastes interfere with theirs.

Want to see the benefits of each herb, or what it is helpful to do for you? Check my list of herbal tea benefits

Now for a number of variations. Try the one with the combination of herbs that you can get.

Colds and Flu Tea

1 oz Blackberry leaves
1 oz Elder flowers
1 oz Linden flowers
1 oz Peppermint leaves

Pour 1 cup boiling water over 2 tablespoons of this mixture. Cover, and steep 10 minutes; strain.

Colds and Hoarseness Tea

2 oz Malva flowers
1 ½ oz Mullein flowers

Use 2 tablespoons of this mixture per cup of hot water. Steep for 10 minutes; strain.

Drink only two to three cups per day for just a few days.

Winter Tea

Use equal parts of each herb, or a pre-made teabag of each.

1 of boneset
1 of echinacea
and 1 of peppermint

The echinacea works as an immune system builder, the boneset is great for congestion, aches and fever (the classic flu symptoms), and the peppermint aids with any stomach complaints due to drainage from the sinuses, and just works as a great overall "feel-good."

Coughing Fits Tea

1 1/3 oz. St. John's Wort
2/3 oz. Thyme
2/3 oz. Linden Flowers

Use 1 teaspoon of the herb mixture per cup of boiling water to soothe irritations of the upper respiratory tract that cause coughing. Steep for 5-10 minutes, strain, and sweeten if necessary. This tea has proved helpful with bronchitis and whooping cough.

Echinacea and Roots Tea

A tasty way to help strengthen and support your natural resistance. A very popular tea.

1 part echinacea purpurea root
1 part pau d'arco
1 part dandelion root (raw and roasted)
1 part sarsaparilla bark
1 part cinnamon barks
1 part ginger root
1 part burdock roots
1 part sassafras bark
a pinch of stevia

Flu-away Tea

2 medium cloves of freshly crushed garlic
1 cup of very warm water
1 teaspoon of honey
1 teaspoon of lemon juice

Stir and drink.

Spiced Relief

anise seed

1 teaspoon anise seeds, crushed or ground
2-3 cinnamon sticks
1 inch of ginger, sliced
1-2 teaspoons dried loose Echinacea

Combine spices and Echinacea in a pot with three cups of water. Bring to a boil and then simmer for 15-20 minutes to make a decoction. Strain into a mug and add honey to taste. This is a multi-function tea. Anise acts as an expectorant, ginger soothes the cough, and cinnamon has anti-bacterial properties.

Soar Throat Tea

Licorice root
Slippery Elm
Peppermint

Put one tablespoon of each herb into a coffee maker and brew, steep, for a short while. Add honey or your favourite sweetner.

The Common Cold Tea

1 1/2 tablespoons of Licorice root already brewed in a pot enough for two cups.
Elderberry tea bag
Chamomile

Steep the tea bag in the Licorice Root infusion and add in the Chamomile. This can be done in the coffee maker, but the Licorice brew must be cool enough to be cycled through the machine.

Dry Congestion Tea

(For thick congestion and irritated mucous membranes.)

2 parts Eyebright
1 part Catnip
2 parts Thyme
1 part Goldenrod

Steep 1-1/2 to 2 teaspoons of this mix in a larger cup, such as a coffee mug, for 10 minutes. You will likely need lemon or honey, as this remedy is rather bitter, but very soothing. Try to stay warm while drinking, and for a time afterwards.

If you experience any discomfort or unpleasant effects while drinking this tea, discontinue use. All herbs listed above are generally safe, though precautions should always be taken when using any type of medicine.

During Cold or Sinus Season Tea

1 small handfull (about 1/4 cup) dried thyme
1 small handfull (about 1/4 cup) dried feverfew flowers
1 large handfull (about 3/4 cup) dried peppermint leaves
1 Tablespoon dried and rubbed or crushed sage

Stop That Cough Tea


1 tablespoon Slippery Elm
1 tablespoon Mullein
1 tablespoon Catnip
1 tablespoon Licorice root bark

Boil the bark first in two cups worth of water for 10 minutes. Place the rest of the herbs in a coffee filter and place the filter in a strainer. Strain the Licorice tea through the strainer into a mug and drink. Honey and lemon can be added.