Kalanchoe Daigremontiana Identified

by Ann

Kalanchoe daigremontiana, Bryophyllum daigremontianum

Kalanchoe daigremontiana, Bryophyllum daigremontianum

The "Can you identify this plant?" you've shown in the picture is a Kalanchoe daigremontiana syn. Bryophyllum daigremontianum. Also called Devil's Backbone, Alligator Plant, Mexican Hat Plant or Mother of Thousands, It is a succulent plant native to Madagascar.


Wow, thanks, Ann!
This agrees with another identification just made. You have added more names, which may help others who are familiar with those common names.
Sometimes a plant is known by one name in one area, and by a totally different name in another.

This is very helpful. Thanks, Ann.

Blessings,
Ruth

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May 18, 2015
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Another comment from Mim Roma, Australia
by: Ruth

Common name is MotherThousands. I have many of these hardy plants and re-pot the babies when they drop off the mother plant.

Ruth: That sounds like fun. I wonder if that would work in Canada too?

Is this plant, the Kalanchoe Daigremontiana, most common in the southern hemispheres?

Do you think it could survive a Canadian winter as in an indoor house plant?

Blessings,
Ruth

May 18, 2015
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starstarstarstarstar
Another comment from Mim Roma, Australia
by: Ruth

Common name is MotherThousands. I have many of these hardy plants and re-pot the babies when they drop off the mother plant.

Ruth: That sounds like fun. I wonder if that would work in Canada too?

Is this plant, the Kalanchoe Daigremontiana, most common in the southern hemispheres?

Do you think it could survive a Canadian winter as in an indoor house plant?

Blessings,
Ruth

Apr 29, 2015
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Grandma called this a tear plant
by: Jan C

I found this very interesting. My Grandma used to have this plant when I was a child. We called it a tear plant.
I loved pulling the little tears off.
I recently found 1, I think, and will have to wait and see when it
matures a bit and gets the little plants around the leaves.
Thanks for the info.

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